Women's Health

Doctor Megan Rossi: Here are the five ways to minimize your hangover this New Year’s Eve

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A doctor has revealed five ways to minimize your hangover this New Year’s Eve, and why you should avoid champagne or “anything with bubbles” if you want to wake up fresh.

Harley Street’s chief dietitian and researcher at King’s College, Dr Megan Rossi, from Queensland, pointed to research that has shown why drinking alcohol with bubbles is a nightmare for your liver and blood circulation.

The Aussie expert also shared her other tips for ‘maximizing the pleasure and minimizing the pain this New Year’s Eve’.

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A doctor (pictured) has revealed the five ways to minimize your hangover this New Year's Eve, and why you should avoid champagne if you want to wake up refreshed

A doctor (pictured) has revealed the five ways to minimize your hangover this New Year’s Eve, and why you should avoid champagne if you want to wake up refreshed

1. Prime Your Gut Microbes

The first thing Dr. Megan Rossi said will help you in your quest to have fun and wake up feeling great on January 1 if you “prime your gut microbes so they can protect you.”

“If your gut microbes are in good shape, they are more likely to produce more butyrate, which may well help the body better resist the anti-inflammatory effects of alcohol,” Dr. Rossi posted on Instagram.

To help your gut, the doctor recommends that before and after any party, you enjoy “nutritious, plant-rich dishes like baked Greek beans.”

She said these will “satisfy salty and carby hangover cravings, too.”

Dr Megan Rossi (pictured) says you need to prime your gut microbes by eating first;  she recommends nutritious plant-based foods rich in fruits and vegetables

Dr Megan Rossi (pictured) says you need to prime your gut microbes by eating first;  she recommends nutritious plant-based foods rich in fruits and vegetables

Dr Megan Rossi (pictured) says you need to prime your gut microbes by eating first; she recommends nutritious plant-based foods rich in fruits and vegetables

2. Avoid bubbles

On top of that, Dr Rossi said it’s a great idea if you limit your intake of anything with bubbles “because it’ll probably make you feel worse.”

“Researchers at the HPRU Medical Research Center in Guildford gave volunteers either bubbly or still champagne. Those who received the bubbly got drunk faster,” she said.

“That’s because the bubbles cause the alcohol to be absorbed into your bloodstream more quickly, exceeding your liver’s ability to digest it at such speed.”

Dr Rossi added: “The higher your blood alcohol level, the more toxic the impact.”

You’re much better off sticking to flat alcoholic drinks like wine and limiting your intake of Prosecco and fizz.

Dr Rossi (pictured) said blenders with artificial sweeteners are never a good idea;  it is better to drink alcohol with soda water and frozen berries

Dr Rossi (pictured) said blenders with artificial sweeteners are never a good idea;  it is better to drink alcohol with soda water and frozen berries

Dr Rossi (pictured) said blenders with artificial sweeteners are never a good idea; it is better to drink alcohol with soda water and frozen berries

3. Beware of blenders with artificial sweeteners

Dr. Rossi said blenders with artificial sweeteners are never a good idea.

“A study from Northern Kentucky University found that if you drank diet vodka and soda or regular vodka and soda, the “diet” version actually resulted in a 25% higher blood alcohol concentration. high,” she said.

Even better, Dr. Rossi says you can replace sugary sodas entirely with frozen berries and sparkling water.

‘Doing so [thanks to the water content] will slow alcohol absorption even more,” she said.

4. Eat before you drink

It sounds simple, but still so many people fail to eat anything an hour or two before an extended period of drinking.

“Prioritize food before drinking, and on a night out, always eat food first to slow alcohol absorption and give your liver a chance to keep up,” says Dr Rossi. .

Something that’s high in protein is often a good call before a night out.

Finally, Dr Rossi (pictured) explained that staying hydrated before, during and after drinking is key to a successful night's sleep.

Finally, Dr Rossi (pictured) explained that staying hydrated before, during and after drinking is key to a successful night's sleep.

Finally, Dr Rossi (pictured) explained that staying hydrated before, during and after drinking is key to a successful night’s sleep.

5. Stay hydrated

Finally, Dr. Rossi explained that staying hydrated before, during and after drinking is key to a successful night.

She recommends replacing all other drinks with non-alcoholic options like sparkling water with frozen berries or kombucha.

“And if the worst does happen and you end up hungover, you can always try an electrolyte drink, which contains salts like potassium and can help you absorb fluids better while you rehydrate,” she said.

Previously, the doctor (pictured) said you should aim to eat up to 30 different plant-based foods each week.

Previously, the doctor (pictured) said you should aim to eat up to 30 different plant-based foods each week.

Previously, the doctor (pictured) said you should aim to eat up to 30 different plant-based foods each week.

Three simple things to improve your gut health

1. Eat 30 different plant foods each week.

2. Move and exercise as much as possible to regulate your bowel movements and increase the diversity of your gut microbes.

3. Avoid unnecessary medications and smoking, as growing research suggests these can impact our gut microbes.

Previously, Dr. Megan Rossi shared the three biggest myths surrounding gut health that people believe to be true.

Dr Rossi said one of the biggest myths is that people often think they have to follow a restrictive diet to be healthy.

“So many people think they need to eat a certain way, but taking care of your gut health is all about inclusivity, moderation and plant-based diversity,” she told Daily Mail Australia.

Dr. Rossi recommends trying to eat 30 different types of plant-based foods each week because they contain “different fibers and chemicals that feed the different bacteria in your gut.”

“From whole grains to vegetables, fruits, legumes, seeds and nuts, research has shown that those who reach their 30s have a more diverse range of gut microbes than those who don’t,” Dr. Rossi said.

“It’s a marker of good gut health and has also been linked to better long-term health.”

The second myth the expert is keen to bust is that cutting carbs will help your stomach:

“Carbohydrates have been unfairly stigmatized when it comes to our health, but they’re not to be feared,” Dr. Rossi said.

“Cutting carbs means you’re also cutting out important types of fiber, which can negatively impact your gut bacteria because fiber is their favorite food and feeds our gut microbes.”

The third thing the “gut health doctor” said she often hears is that sucrose (or sugar) is bad for your gut.

“Sugar is actually absorbed higher up in your gut, so it doesn’t reach your lower gut where the majority of the microbes are,” she said.

“That means you definitely shouldn’t cut fruit because of its sucrose content.”

Dr. Rossi is the author of the book Eat Yourself Healthy, An Easy-to-Digest Guide to Health and Happiness from the Inside Out.

For more information, please click here.

Origin: | This article originally belongs to Dailymail.co.uk



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