Women's Health

Former Finks biker Charlie Barakat performed community service after being spared jail

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A former biker who once said he wanted his club to be ‘Australia’s most notorious biker club’ will be able to live more freely in the community after being spared jail when he said he left his life of crime behind.

Charlie Barakat, 40, pleaded guilty to knowingly or recklessly leading a criminal group in October this year.

Police had discovered incriminating texts on his phone which confirmed his senior rank in the Castle Hill chapter of the Finks Motorcycle Club in Sydney’s north-west.

While pleading guilty in October, Barakat told magistrate Glenn Bartley that he had left the Finks and was no longer involved with the club.

Charlie Barakat, 40, pleaded guilty to knowingly or recklessly leading a criminal group in October this year.  Police had discovered incriminating texts on his phone which confirmed his senior rank in the Castle Hill chapter of the Finks Motorcycle Club in Sydney's north-west.

Charlie Barakat, 40, pleaded guilty to knowingly or recklessly leading a criminal group in October this year. Police had discovered incriminating texts on his phone which confirmed his senior rank in the Castle Hill chapter of the Finks Motorcycle Club in Sydney’s north-west.

He was spared jail time but was placed on an Intensive Correction Order and sentenced to perform 300 hours of community service.

The only more serious punishment given to someone than an intensive correctional order is imprisonment.

Barakat’s legal team successfully argued that the order was too harsh given that he had given up the life of a biker and his risk of reoffending was low.

Last week Barakat’s sentence was reduced to a community correction order where he will have to perform 100 hours of community service, the Daily Telegraph reported.

While pleading guilty in October, Barakat told magistrate Glenn Bartley that he had left the Finks and was no longer involved with the club.

While pleading guilty in October, Barakat told magistrate Glenn Bartley that he had left the Finks and was no longer involved with the club.

While pleading guilty in October, Barakat told magistrate Glenn Bartley that he had left the Finks and was no longer involved with the club.

Some of the material found on the 40-year-old’s phone showed associates of Finks discussing drug trafficking and acts of violence under Barakat’s orders.

Posts showed Barakat discussing the logistics of completing meth and cannabis deals, according to agreed facts presented to the court.

Police also uncovered a video that had been sent to Barakat which shows a fight between members of Finks, with one accusing two others of robbing the club.

“People don’t need (sic) we’re not Australia’s most notorious motorcycle club for nothing,” Barakat said.

Barakat had once said that he wanted the Finks Motorcycle Club to be the

Barakat had once said that he wanted the Finks Motorcycle Club to be the

Barakat once said he wanted the Finks Motorcycle Club to be Australia’s “most notorious motorcycle club”.

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