Women's Health

Judge reprimands migrant who turned to crime after arriving in Britain illegally by boat

ProDentim

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A Crown Court judge has reprimanded an Albanian migrant who turned to crime after arriving in Britain illegally by boat.

Sentencing Fatmir Limani, who robbed a house in Leeds, to 18 months in prison earlier this month, Judge Simon Batiste told him: “Unfortunately the UK has far too many criminals. We don’t need to bring them from Albania.

It comes as figures obtained by The Mail on Sunday show that 75% of Albanian nationals who arrived illegally have since committed at least one criminal offense in the UK.

And 30% of the Class A drug trade in Britain is now controlled by Albanian gang lords.

Albanians – many of whom arrived in Britain illegally on trucks and small boats – now make up the largest contingent of foreign prisoners in UK prisons, with 1,582 held here.

Fatmir Limani (pictured), who robbed a house in Leeds, was sentenced to 18 months in jail

Fatmir Limani (pictured), who robbed a house in Leeds, was sentenced to 18 months in jail

So far this year, 93 Albanians have been jailed – at a cost to the taxpayer of £17million – for serious offenses including murder, rape, kidnapping and burglary, including 14 in the past week.

They include six killers, a rapist, a kidnapper, five Class A drug dealers and 56 cannabis growers.

Of the 93 imprisoned, at least 53 came to the UK illegally, either on small boats or in the back of lorries.

Albanians made up the largest proportion of the more than 45,000 people who crossed the English Channel illegally last year.

At one point last summer, they accounted for 60% of small boat arrivals. Thousands have sought asylum, even though Albania is considered “safe and hospitable” by the Foreign Ministry.

Our data does not include those who have not been imprisoned or who have appeared in magistrates’ courts – which would make the total much higher.

In addition to Judge Batiste’s remarks to Limani at Leeds Crown Court, other judges across the country have also expressed concern that illegal migrants turn to crime once they reach Britain.

Two weeks ago, Judge Joanne Kidd sent cannabis grower Aurel Kajo to jail for 20 months at Durham Crown Court. Albanian Kajo had paid £4,000 to be smuggled into Britain.

Sentencing Fatmir Limani, Judge Simon Batiste told him: “Unfortunately the UK has far too many criminals.  We don't need to bring them from Albania

Sentencing Fatmir Limani, Judge Simon Batiste told him: “Unfortunately the UK has far too many criminals.  We don't need to bring them from Albania

Sentencing Fatmir Limani, Judge Simon Batiste told him: “Unfortunately the UK has far too many criminals. We don’t need to bring them from Albania”

It comes as figures obtained by The Mail on Sunday show that 75% of Albanian nationals who arrived illegally have since committed at least one criminal offense in the UK (file photo)

It comes as figures obtained by The Mail on Sunday show that 75% of Albanian nationals who arrived illegally have since committed at least one criminal offense in the UK (file photo)

It comes as figures obtained by The Mail on Sunday show that 75% of Albanian nationals who arrived illegally have since committed at least one criminal offense in the UK (file photo)

Judge Kidd told Kajo: ‘The message needs to get out that people who enter this country illegally and choose to become involved in criminal activity will likely be jailed and then deported.’

And at Nottingham Crown Court in January, Judge Tanweer Ikram told Albanian Elmas Sitaj, jailed for ten months for producing cannabis: ‘You come here illegally, you take a risk. It can never be right for you to turn to crime. It’s not a get-rich-quick country. Life is hard and people are not paid very well.

Home Secretary Suella Braverman last week told how thousands of criminals who ‘possess values ​​contrary to our country’ smuggled into Britain on small boats.

She said: ‘We are seeing an increase in crime among people who have come on boats, linked to drug trafficking, exploitation and prostitution. There are real challenges that go beyond the migration issue of people coming here illegally.

“In my conversations with many police chiefs across the country, they now report to me that the drug gangs they deal with are people who came on small boats. Many people come here illegally and very quickly become involved in drug trafficking, other forms of exploitation, crime and prostitution.

Origin: | This article originally belongs to Dailymail.co.uk

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